Orban 536A Effect Processor
Manufacturer:
Model:
536A
Date:
1993
Category:
Group:
Description:
De-Esser

Information

The Orban 536A Dynamic Sibilance Controller has been designed as a universal de-esser for the recording, broadcast, and motion picture industries. It offers electrical specifications consistent with other state-of-the-art audio signal processing equipment, extremely simple setup and operation, and dynamic characteristics which have been optimized for sibilance control. The 536A incorporates a circuit which forces the threshold of de-essing to track the average input level, permitting constant amounts of de-essing and audibly consistent results over an input level range of approximately 15dB. De-essers have existed for years, usually as frequency-dependent sidechains in limiters or compressors. However, a compressor used as a de-esser cannot function optimally if one attempts to compress and de-ess with the same device, since optimum compression ratios, attack times, and release times are quite different for the two modes of operation. In addition, such devices are often insufficiently adjustable, and often contain simple filters whose selectivity cannot provide enough differentiation between sibilance frequencies and the lower frequencies where most of the voice energy is concentrated. Further, these devices cannot simultaneously de-ess voice and maintain natural dynamic range because their thresholds are fixed. A specialized de-esser is therefore necessary to perform sibilance control only. It is ordinarily the last piece of processing hardware in a chain which may include both an Equalizer and a compressor or limiter. Both devices will tend to increase sibilance with reference to the energy of the lower-frequency vocal components; the de-esser then reduces sibilance levels until they are once again natural-sounding and do not cause overload in recording media employing high frequency preemphasis. Many voices, especially female, produce relatively high levels of sibilant energy. This can be exaggerated by close miking techniques (especially condenser mics), and by audio processing. Such exaggerated sibilance is not only annoying aesthetically, but also can cause saturation of slow-speed tape recordings (such as cassette), resulting in severe IM distortion on sibilance. Similar problems can occur in optical film recording. In disk recording, untrackably high velocities can be produced. The 536A controls the level of the sibilance to make it sound aesthetically natural and to avoid overload problems. When not de-essing, it acts like a high-quality Amplifier. How It Works: When the level in the sibilance band (around 6kHz) attempts to exceed a certain fraction of the peak input level (determined by the THRESHOLD control), the channel gain is automatically reduced to hold the output at this threshold level. This gain reduction occurs only during sibilance. After each sibilant, the gain recovers so quickly that subsequent vocal sounds are audibly unaffected. Because the entire channel gain is reduced (as opposed to de-essers which operate as program-controlled filters), any residual IM distortion which accompanies the original sibilance is reduced along with the sibilance itself. Because the de-essing threshold automatically tracks the input level, the de-esser forces the balance between the sibilance and "voiced" speech to remain consistent over an input level range of more than 15dB. Thus recordings whose natural dynamic range has been preserved can be effectively de-essed.

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Service and User Manual
Manual type:
Service and User Manual
Pages:
37
Size:
2.60 Mbytes (2728302 Bytes)
Language:
english
Revision:
Manual ID:
95034-000-05
Date:
01 January 1993
Quality:
Scanned document, all readable.
Upload date:
25 October 2017
MD5:
4f00f4b4a0ec2b83a40ba5c58c1ac100
Downloads:
431

Information

1 Registration Card 1 Warranty 1 Performance Highlights 2 Part A: Introduction 2 Introduction 2 How It Works 2 Limitations 2 Use Your Ears 2 Front Panel Description 2 Rear Panel Description 3 Part B: Installation 3 Equipment Location 3 Installation Of Options 3 Electrical Installation 3 AC Power 4 AUDIO 4 Input 4 Input Gain Strapping 5 Output 5 Preferred Wiring 6 General Input/Output Connection Rules 7 If You've Followed The Rules And It Still Hums... 8 Wiring the 536A With Single-Conductor Shielded Cable 9 Part C: Operating Instructions 9 Applicability And Limitations 9 Location in The System 9 Adjustment Of The Operating Controls 10 Internal Adjustment For Unusually Noisy Program Material PAGE 11 Part D: Maintenance 11 1: Performance Test And Alignment 11 Equipment Required 11 Power Supply 11 Signal Processing Circuitry 13 2: Maintenance And Service 13 Preventive Maintenance 13 Corrective Maintenance 13 Component Replacement 13 Replacement Parts 13 Desoldering Of Components On Printed Circuit Boards 15 Troubleshooting IC Opamps 15 Factory Service 15 Shipping Instructions 16 3: Circuit Description 16 Input Buffer 16 Voltage-Controlled Attenuator 17 Control Circuit 17 Level-Tracking Circuit 18 Overload Indicator 19 Power Supply 20 Appendix A: Interconnections And Grounding 20 Driving The 536A From High Impedance Or High Level Sources 20 Grounding 22 Appendix B: Specifications 23 Parts List 29 Schematic Diagram Assembly Drawing

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